“My sister’s advance care plan was simple – she wanted to be at home with her family around her.  That was it. Not in hospital, not in a swirl of chaos in an emergency department …we worked with her team to make it happen that way.”

“We knew what we wanted, but we didn’t know how to make everyone else know.”

“Knowing what my sister wanted was important. Everyone must have these conversations. As much as we didn’t want to talk about it, we needed to.”

“It is very difficult when a loved one is in and out of lucidity. I represented his wishes most often and felt that my voice was not being listened to by the frontline team. The caregivers voice should be a primary concern of the palliative team in situations such as this.”

“They listened to me. They understood—I knew what my husband wanted. If they didn’t understand, they asked. We all agreed.”

“We were in a panic [every time she went to the city] that something would happen. Even though the directive went with her, we worried.”

“After my husband’s death, no  one seemed the least bit interested in the fact that I still had some very dangerous prescription medications in my home.”

“[We] did not know what to have, where to get it, when. Or even who was responsible for the purchases or from where.”

“Six weeks after my  sister died, my brother-in-law still couldn’t get into his garage.  It was full of equipment he moved out of the house, so he didn’t have to face it  every day.”

“Because medications kept changing, we had a lot of confusion. A doc would give us a new medication, but not necessarily tell us it was replacing something else. Only once was there a full review with us about what to take and what to stop.”

“When we moved, it was a new conversation, starting from the beginning again. I expected, things should be the same, they should – shouldn’t they?” “If a person can die at home in one province, shouldn’t they be able to just the same somewhere else?.”

“It’s crazy, my Mom and Dad lived and died less than a hundred and fifty kilometers apart and it was all completely different.”

“When we moved, it was a new conversation, starting from the beginning again. I expected, things should be the same, they should – shouldn’t they?” “If a person can die at home in one province, shouldn’t they be able to just the same somewhere else?.”

“As a same sex couple, I can say I felt respected and the relationship was valued for what it was. Just like every other couple in home care.”

“As a same sex couple, I can say I felt respected and the relationship was valued for what it was. Just like every other couple in home care.”

Every year, we recognize and celebrate all caregivers across Canada on the first Tuesday of April.

The theme for the campaign reinforces a national health care policy priority “how palliative care is provided in Canada”. Building on the December 2018 release of the Framework on Palliative Care in Canada, the events for the day recognize the vital role of caregivers and their experiences in providing care and support for their loved ones with life-limiting illness. Understanding the vital role that caregivers have and the need to provide choice and supports for both the caregiver and patient will be reinforced through the theme “Caregivers’ experiences of palliative care in Canada”

Receiving care and dying in the place of choice are measures of good quality care. Learn about Canadian’s experiences of receiving palliative care in their home, residential hospices, long-term care facilities and hospitals.

We’ve created sharable images for you to take part in the celebration and share with your networks.

Additional information and resources will be available soon to support awareness of caregivers’ experiences and help them stay connected.

ABOUT NATIONAL CARERS DAY

In April 2010, the Parliament of Canada unanimously adopted a motion declaring the first Tuesday in April “The Invisible Work Day.” This day was designated to recognize the importance of the “invisible” unpaid work carried out by parents and caregivers on behalf of their children and aging family members, as well as the volunteer work done in the community.  Recognizing that caregivers come from all walks of life and take on many roles, the first Tuesday in April is a special day where we can recognize all caring Canadians.

A milestone for Canadian Carers

Prime Minister’s Statement in Recognition of Carers

2018 National Carers Day

Connecting Carers was a campaign to raise awareness of carers’ needs and the importance of connecting and accessing support earlier rather than later in their care journeys. 

2017 National Carers Day

Carers Canada celebrated National Carers Day on April 3, 2017. This year’s theme “Caring at Home” aims to raise awareness of the invaluable role carers provide to support older adults with frailty, individuals with complex, chronic disabling conditions, and those at end-of-life to stay safely at home. 

2016 National Carers Day

In 2016, Carers Canada celebrated National Carers Day on April 5. Through our “Because I Care – Recognizing Caring Canadians” campaign, we built awareness and reinforced the diversity of ‘caring’ Canadians. Over 150 individuals and organizations added their name to our Caring Wall to visibly showed their support for caring moms, dads, sisters, brothers, spouses, friends, family and neighbours who make a difference in the lives of their loved ones every day. Download Press Release

2015 National Carers Day

In 2015, the Canadian Caregiver Coalition celebrated National Family Caregiver Day on April 7. Our theme was Care & Work: A Balancing Act in recognition of the 6.1 million Canadians who must balance their personal commitments, caregiving duties and work responsibilities. Download the CCC press release

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